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Scotch with or without water?
#21
+2
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#22
With a single malt I have not tried I will start off neat and add water drop by drop to see if I like it. Some I like neat and some I like to add a drop to a splash of water. When I started I used an ice cube to two so I could get a taste for single malt. Now Ice does not come near my single malts. I heart of a cocktail of Drambuie and blended scotch but have not tried it. It interests me but not taken the step as of yet.
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#23
Do yourself a favor and see what it means to "open up" a whisky.
Take a glass of freshly poured whisky ad hold it around your mid-stomach area. Inhale and slowly raise the glass to your nose. Note the distance you begin to smell the nectar.
Now, add a teaspoon of water and stir a bit. Then repeat the test. You'll find the aroma is now more distinct at a much greater distance. This is opening up the whisky.
Now, consider that most of your sense of taste is actually smell. You can only taste 4 things. Sweet, bitter, sour and salt. Everything else is aroma (which is why when you have a cold you can't taste anything). So... if you like the taste of whisky, you want more of it, open it up a bit.
By the way, chilling holds the aromas more compact. Less energy to release the particles we know to be smell. That's why we americans drink our beer cold. because it tastes like swill. In the UK a pint of bitters will re-educate anyone on what a beer should taste like and you'll see why they drink it warm.

I was in London many years ago and ordered a gin and tonic and specifically asked for it on ice. The waiter served the ice in a separate glass. I asked why he didn't put it in, he said something like if a sin was to be committed, it wasn't going to be him.
Jonathan Charles Axisa, my beloved son, 11/7/1979 - 7/8/2010

Ғµ(Ķ Cancer
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#24
If there is no wrong way, then I am right too! Smile
“Evil is sweet in the beginning, but bitter in the end.”
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#25
(10-26-2012, 07:30 AM)Skipper the cigar aFISHinodo Wrote: Do yourself a favor and see what it means to "open up" a whisky.
Take a glass of freshly poured whisky ad hold it around your mid-stomach area. Inhale and slowly raise the glass to your nose. Note the distance you begin to smell the nectar.
Now, add a teaspoon of water and stir a bit. Then repeat the test. You'll find the aroma is now more distinct at a much greater distance. This is opening up the whisky.
Now, consider that most of your sense of taste is actually smell. You can only taste 4 things. Sweet, bitter, sour and salt. Everything else is aroma (which is why when you have a cold you can't taste anything). So... if you like the taste of whisky, you want more of it, open it up a bit.
By the way, chilling holds the aromas more compact. Less energy to release the particles we know to be smell. That's why we americans drink our beer cold. because it tastes like swill. In the UK a pint of bitters will re-educate anyone on what a beer should taste like and you'll see why they drink it warm.

I was in London many years ago and ordered a gin and tonic and specifically asked for it on ice. The waiter served the ice in a separate glass. I asked why he didn't put it in, he said something like if a sin was to be committed, it wasn't going to be him.

This answered my question, I kept reading add a drop of water and I wasn't sure if you guys sat there with droppers filled with water, took a sip then grabbed your dropper and add a drop...this seemed crazy to me, but I wouldn't put it past any of you lol.

I am actually going to a whisky (notice no E Parkster?) tasting event and I hope to learn more in this art that I know very little of....and I thank you all for your input.
Gangsta
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#26
(10-26-2012, 09:26 AM)Ari Wrote: If there is no wrong way, then I am right too! Smile

Let's not be hasty.







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#27
Nice comments Skipper...
--Easy

"If there are no cigars in Heaven, I shall not go." --Mark Twain
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#28
(10-26-2012, 07:30 AM)Skipper the cigar aFISHinodo Wrote: Do yourself a favor and see what it means to "open up" a whisky.
Take a glass of freshly poured whisky ad hold it around your mid-stomach area. Inhale and slowly raise the glass to your nose. Note the distance you begin to smell the nectar.
Now, add a teaspoon of water and stir a bit. Then repeat the test. You'll find the aroma is now more distinct at a much greater distance. This is opening up the whisky.
Now, consider that most of your sense of taste is actually smell. You can only taste 4 things. Sweet, bitter, sour and salt. Everything else is aroma (which is why when you have a cold you can't taste anything). So... if you like the taste of whisky, you want more of it, open it up a bit.
By the way, chilling holds the aromas more compact. Less energy to release the particles we know to be smell. That's why we americans drink our beer cold. because it tastes like swill. In the UK a pint of bitters will re-educate anyone on what a beer should taste like and you'll see why they drink it warm.

I was in London many years ago and ordered a gin and tonic and specifically asked for it on ice. The waiter served the ice in a separate glass. I asked why he didn't put it in, he said something like if a sin was to be committed, it wasn't going to be him.

I remember when you showed me this for the first time in Mohegan a few years ago...It really is amazing the difference that is made.
--Mike

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