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Walk In humidifier systems?
#11
You will need to insulate but a thin foam sheet 1/2 is a 3.3 R value to 3/4 is 5 R value will do more then fine. The biggest benefit will be is to seal the space. You can use a tyvek wrap to do that with that will not let 1 drop of moisture out of the space into the walls and is critical. First layer is the sheetrock that is in place,then the insul/foam then the tyvek to seal the room and finally the wood wall cover. I can check with my people on the peltier unit but I need dead nut measurments of the space. They not only need thickness to calculate but type of wood, foam and exterior.  Maybe we can talk later because I really cant type all this.You will also need a threashold on the door for a positive seal but that's no BFD for you to do I'm thinkin. I'm telling you these units are NOT cheap for that large of space. What you see in pic 1 is on the inside. You do need backspace also with these. What is behind or beside the closet? In the second pic the cab at the top you can see the depth of the units back is almost as thick as what is in the humi. That is the heatsink fins on the back of the unit.





[Image: thermocooler.jpg]

 
 


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#12
tafdom Wrote:You will need to insulate but a thin foam sheet 1/2 is a 3.3 R value to 3/4 is 5 R value will do more then fine. The biggest benefit will be is to seal the space. You can use a tyvek wrap to do that with that will not let 1 drop of moisture out of the space into the walls and is critical. First layer is the sheetrock that is in place,then the insul/foam then the tyvek to seal the room and finally the wood wall cover. I can check with my people on the peltier unit but I need dead nut measurments of the space. They not only need thickness to calculate but type of wood, foam and exterior.  Maybe we can talk later because I really cant type all this.You will also need a threashold on the door for a positive seal but that's no BFD for you to do I'm thinkin. I'm telling you these units are NOT cheap for that large of space. What you see in pic 1 is on the inside. You do need backspace also with these. What is behind or beside the closet? In the second pic the cab at the top you can see the depth of the units back is almost as thick as what is in the humi. That is the heatsink fins on the back of the unit.





[Image: thermocooler.jpg]

 
 
These also create condensation on the cool side which is not a  problem, but you have to take that into consideration and collect that condensation  when you design you walk in. Avallo, and Stabell use a collection plate made of copper and drain the water back to the reservoir.
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#13
Hmmmmm.

This is some really, really good info.

Two sides, or about a side and a half anyway, are exterior wall . . . south facing exterior wall, in fact. So that's a major concern. I figure I'll plant some shade and insulate heavily on those sides.

I could route an A/C duct into the closet (the master bedroom closet has one already) but I'm concerned about blowing dried out air into my humidor, obviously.

My initial, sketchy plan was to build an insulated box in one corner of the closet and cool the inside of IT with one or more of those units . . . and then draw air through the box and blow it out into walkin, with a fan that comes on every so often, maybe thermostat-controlled. But I'm no engineer, and have no damn idea if that'll actually work or not.

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#14
I would think that if your humidifier is sized correctly it will be able to keep up with the drier air being introduced by the a/c system. Don't forget when the control sees a drop in humidity it will become active.

The biggest concern I would have is venting air from the room in a controlled matter. As you pump in cool air you have to have a way of releasing air from the room. I have seen a lot of information on walk ins with detailed information before. Have you done a search and found any of these sights?
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#15
Well, that's basically why I'd rather recirculate and cool the air already IN the closet. It's not like the door won't get opened regularly to let a little fresh air in, after all. Big Grin

I've followed the build notes on a couple projects that have been posted as links here, but haven't looked that closely at the tech stuff. Guess I should, huh? :?

There's time. If my offer gets accepted today, I still won't be in the house before August. I'm in the research stage at this point, so I can plan it all out before tearing anything up. Big Grin

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#16
I remember seeing a site that was very detailed in the setup. I'll look for it later when I have some time. I'll post it here if I find it and think the info is of use.
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#17
A few links to look at.

http://tobacconistu.blogspot.com/2007/11...midor.html

http://www.feithonline.com/humidor/
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#18
[user=35]Skipper the cigar aFISHinodo[/user] wrote:
Quote:Screw all that nonsense. Do the only "Rob" thing.

You will need:
  • 47 pounds of beads
  • 93 bowls
  • 93 ousts fans
  • 186 AA batteries
put 1/2 pound of beads in each bowl. Scatter the bowls around the walk-in. Arrange each of the 93 ousts fans (after installing the batteries) just above each bowl of 1/2 pound beads.

It may be a good idea to number the bowls and fans so when checking them for clarity (moisture content) you wont miss any.

I know this solution wont be cheap but think of it as a new hobby as you check the batteries, fans, beads and everything else roughly weekly.

Oh, you may want to keep a parker handy and ear plugs. I'm thinking 93 ousts fans will make a bit of noise and there will be 1 heck of a draft.
 

Man I miss RobSad
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#19
This is worth looking at as a temp. control option.

http://www.beveragefactory.com/wine/cool...AP-9.shtml
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#20
[user=480]fishhound[/user] wrote:
Quote:This is worth looking at as a temp. control option.

http://www.beveragefactory.com/wine/cool...AP-9.shtml

I owe you booze and 'gars. Smile

Seriously, that's IT. That IS the ticket . . . the smallest one, at $455, is exactly what I'll need. I can install it in the shared wall so that it vents into the guest room walkin closet, which will basically be tool and art supply storage. Perfect.

Was over there today . . . it's a go. Sign, close, move in sometime late summer when they finish the house. Closet is actually 4' X 4' at the framing so drywalled, insulated, and paneled it'll be something like 45" X 45". Shelves on two walls, humidifier, Koolspace a/c, cigars. Sweet.

This place rocks. Cool

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