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Cigar Construction: Bad draw reason
#1
I just read that the reason "WHY" we sometimes get a cigar with a bad (tight) draw is that a novice roller when rolling moves one hand faster then the other when rolling causing a "twist", sort of like twisting balloons when making balloon animals.

I had previously thought it was merely rolled to tightly.
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#2
interesting. I was under the impression that there were no true novice rollers. All the videos I have seen say that it takes years of doing other jobs to become a roller. I would imagine that by the time you get to the rollers sear, you would have enough knowledge, to not make such a rookie mistake.

My question is how does a poorly rolled cigar like that make it past the draw machine, who's name I cant remember. Do not all companies test the draw?
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#3
Good point! (the draw machine). It seems like that would catch most of them.

In watching one of my fav reviewers online I have seen quite a few big name cigars that he has said had a bad draw.

My last one that was plugged was about 5 weeks ago, a "La Sirena Sea Sprite", the B&M owner gave me a draw poke, but it did nothing after poking it 15 times, so then he told me to grab a second stick, which was also plugged, I was very disappointed. BOTH had a hard hard knot right about where the band is.

It's sort of like having tickets all year to your favorite event then having stomach problems the whole time you are there and spending the whole event in the bathroom.

For Cuban Cigars lately I hear the quality control is not good.
“Evil is sweet in the beginning, but bitter in the end.”
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#4
(10-24-2012, 10:52 AM)Ari Wrote: Good point! (the draw machine). It seems like that would catch most of them.

In watching one of my fav reviewers online I have seen quite a few big name cigars that he has said had a bad draw.

My last one that was plugged was about 5 weeks ago, a "La Sirena Sea Sprite", the B&M owner gave me a draw poke, but it did nothing after poking it 15 times, so then he told me to grab a second stick, which was also plugged, I was very disappointed.

It's sort of like having tickets all year to your favorite event then having stomach problems the whole time you are there and spending the whole event in the bathroom.

For Cuban Cigars lately the quality control is not good.

I would repectfully diagree with the last statement. Since about 2002, The general consensus of my research (including my opinion) is that quality control has increased, with a marked increase that was even more pronounced after 2004 box codes where quality control measures were increased even more. Every Cuban cigar factory currently does have a draw test machine, and there are several quality control steps in place. Cuban cigar are typically rolled by a single person, as opposed to what is commonplace elsewhere where the bunching and rolling are doen by two different people. The individuals are held responsible for their production and any qulaity issues that they produce.

The following is quoted from cubancigarwebsite.com to prevent me from having to type it myself - a good overview of the general process of current quality control measures:

"Quality control is provided by testing and supervision during the rolling, and later by both non-destructive and destructive testing.

The supervisors are expert rollers, who are mainly involved in checking technique, construction and physical cigar sizes at the rolling tables. Each cigar must pass a suction draw test before the wrapper is applied.

After leaving the roller, the cigars go to the quality control section, where each cigar is checked for weight, length, ring size, consistency, construction and appearance.

Samples are also opened up to check internal filler construction, arrangement, and blending of the leaf.

Finally, a sample of the cigars are test-smoked to ensure that they are consistent with the required character of the vitola. They are graded for draw, burn, aroma, flavour, strength, and overall quality."







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#5
Bill,

Thank you for speaking up concerning this actually. Appreciated.

By the way, on another thread I had written that most Cuban cigars are not aged after rolling, they are sent out right away. This is what I have been told by several people. What have you learned concerning this?
“Evil is sweet in the beginning, but bitter in the end.”
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#6
(10-24-2012, 05:39 PM)Ari Wrote: Bill,

Thank you for speaking up concerning this actually. Appreciated.

By the way, on another thread I had written that most Cuban cigars are not aged after rolling, they are sent out right away. This is what I have been told by several people. What have you learned concerning this?

While they are not aged per se after rolling, they do spend time in a lower humidity (lower than ambient tropical conditions) environment to marry and acclimate. Typically the aging comes prior to construction as the various tobaccos are aged between one and five years prior to them being used.







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#7
There was a time where QC was lacking. I'm no authority but many authorities have said so. That's about when I stopped being a cuban consumer (although I still have quite a stash).

As for the general topic of this post... Cigars are hand made. The materials are made by nature. I am shocked that we dont see more plugged cigars. I am sure the reasons for a bad draw are many. Maybe the twist. Maybe too tight a roll. Maybe some characteristic of the leaf causing it to swell... Whatever the reason I'm happy it is a rare occurrence. And among the brands I tend to favor it's very very rare. Not so rare, in my own very humble experience, with Cubans, but still well within acceptable tolerances.
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#8
Entubado Bunch (Entubar)

This is the bunching technique which rolls each filler leaf into itself, almost like a small scroll. Each individually “scrolled” leaf is then placed together to form the bunch. This skillful rolling technique creates a more firmly packed cigar which allows air to travel between all of the leaves, carrying more aromatics/flavors to the palate. Entubado rolling is the most difficult and complex bunching method and is therefore rarely employed in large scale manufacturing.


And other cigar rolling techniques ......


http://www.tobacconistuniversity.org/tob...lling2.asp
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#9
(10-24-2012, 10:52 AM)Ari Wrote: Good point! (the draw machine). It seems like that would catch most of them.

In watching one of my fav reviewers online I have seen quite a few big name cigars that he has said had a bad draw.

My last one that was plugged was about 5 weeks ago, a "La Sirena Sea Sprite", the B&M owner gave me a draw poke, but it did nothing after poking it 15 times, so then he told me to grab a second stick, which was also plugged, I was very disappointed. BOTH had a hard hard knot right about where the band is.

It's sort of like having tickets all year to your favorite event then having stomach problems the whole time you are there and spending the whole event in the bathroom.

For Cuban Cigars lately I hear the quality control is not good.

Not ALL cigars are draw tested, even if the company has a draw tester. I know of several companies who only test one or two cigars per lot, then, and only then will they test the lot and if they determine there is a problem. If the roller does this to many times (3), he will be sent back to his/her apprentice duties.

The point you bring up about the location of the "knot" around or under the band. I have been told that this is a humidity issue. The bands do not "give" as the cigar is humidified. Therefore, the band creates a restriction as the rest of the cigar expands, there's your plug. All the poking in the world will not alleviate the problem. The next time you clip a cigar and before you light,try to draw on it. If is tight or nonexistent, dry box it for a few days and try again. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised. If not, grab another and write that one off to Mother Nature, bad rollers, or just the luck of the draw.

Good topic. Thanks.
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#10
That makes some sense too, the band part you mentioned.

By the way....If anyone is hiring I can be a draw tester, they can have me smoke a few from each batch. LOL
If anyone from Oliva, My Father, Fuente, or similar company is reading this, please contact me. HAHA!
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