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Blending
#1
I was thinking about this the other day. In the past (many moons ago) cigars were basically one dimensional. They had spice but nothing like today. Now a days, you read / smoke about different blends of tobacco in a cigar and on top of them from different countries.

I do have to say I like the variety of blends.

One of the ones I always liked is the Liga Privada Único Serie L40 by Drew Estate, the filler is from Honduran & Nicaragua, the binder is Brazilian Mata Fina and the wrapper is Connecticut River Valley Stalk Cut & Cured Sun Grown Habano. Dod Stogie Fresh recently did a podcast about the above stogie (episode 398).


Sam Leccia is coming out with the "Luchador" a five country blend on May 5th. Looking forward to trying it.

Does anyone have any thoughts on blending; regarding the smoke / cigar etc.
They call me The Mum - Jimmie the Mum
Viva Mumcero - Mahk 12/4/2010 - http://www.stogiechat.com/forum/thread-20737.html
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Weak people seek Revenge, Strong people Forgive, Intelligent people Ignore
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#2
I agree Jimmie blending has a lot of affect on flavor and I think it is great. It must take a lot of talent to blend something and get repeatable flavors. Steve Saka and Liga Privada do a great job blending tobaccos to achieve great flavor.
--Mike

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#3
(04-30-2014, 02:01 PM)wtfdic Wrote: I agree Jimmie blending has a lot of affect on flavor and I think it is great. It must take a lot of talent to blend something and get repeatable flavors. Steve Saka and Liga Privada do a great job blending tobaccos to achieve great flavor.

Agreed
"I do not save cigars for occasions that may not happen. Cigars make the occasion special, not the other way around."

Ryan
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#4
Most of the cigars I've liked the most have been multi country blends

When I started I remember you either liked full bodied cigars or mild and all I thought was what about the flavors

Padron annies and the Undercrowns have stood out to me as cigars they just did right


To think after you grow tobaccos in different parts of the world and blend them together after years of sitting around in warehouses they can consistently make em burn evenly and taste amazing. This is truly and art
Not only do I not know what's going on, I wouldn't know what to do about it if I did.
George Carlin
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#5
I find it astounding to have enough insight and taste buds left to blend tobacco's from all over and make a masterpiece. Best examples that come to mind are 1. the La Palina Goldie #2, which is a complex profile unlike anything I've tried still...and yet a mild stick. Tobacco from Equador, DR, and Nica. 2. Emilio's AF2 with a spicy but semi-sweet creamy stick with tobacco from Equador, Pennsylvania and Nica. 3. Tatuaje Mexican experiment, while only Mexican San Andreas and Nicaragua is one of my all time Mexican wrappered stogies and they are still getting better, beating out the Pepin rolled LADC Mi Amor and even the Face which use the same wrapper.

Great convo starter Mum!
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#6
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They call me The Mum - Jimmie the Mum
Viva Mumcero - Mahk 12/4/2010 - http://www.stogiechat.com/forum/thread-20737.html
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Weak people seek Revenge, Strong people Forgive, Intelligent people Ignore
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#7
Blending is truly an art. And just like with anything else, there are some tobaccos that I tend to like, and others that I don't. And this is further complicated by he fact that saying "Nicaraguan Tobacco" for instance isn't very specific. In order to really get into it, you can narrow it by region (Estelí, Condega, Jalapa, Ometepe), Farm, and even Lot number. And this doesn't take into account differences in fermentation and processing that can have a major impact on the tobacco's characteristics.

If this were not the case, all Nicaraguan cigars would pretty much taste the same (taking out ring gauge and shape characteristics, etc.), all Cuban cigars would taste the same, etc. etc. etc.

These guys that are blending (well) know all of the subtle charcateristics and differences (from all or many of the major tobacco regions), and are able to put them together wonderfully.

I have had some fine cigars with tobaccos from different countries, and I have had fine puros as well. I happen to have my favorite country of origin and brands thereof, but those are just my taste buds.

As always, YMMV. (Your mileage may vary)







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#8
I cant remember a time when cigars weren't blended. non-blended cigars, Puros, were few and far between. At least in the hand-rolled arena. I think the motivation for blending may have changed a bit. In the past I wouldn't be surprised if someone told me that tobaccos from other countries were used to keep the cost down whereas today it is more to hit that desired flavor profile. Or maybe it was always like it is today, both cost and taste in mind. But since my first cigar, with the exception of most cubans (I think), cigars have been blended
Jonathan Charles Axisa, my beloved son, 11/7/1979 - 7/8/2010

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